“Big things happen here”…..Dallas

Dallas city skyline: Dallas, Texas

“Big things happen here”. So this is the official slogan of the city of Dallas, not surprising coming out of the Lone Star State that boasts about the grand scale size of things. Texas is the second largest state in the US, but the largest in the “lower 48”. Alaska weighs in at 663,267 square miles, Texas at 268,580 and California is in 3rd place with 163, 695 square miles. Yes…Texas is very BIG. Big with a diversity of interesting things to offer. Visitors to Dallas can get a taste of Texan living with a great eclectic mix of sites and sounds. A blend of big city life and frontier living all rolled into one place that is quintessential life in the Lone Star state: Dallas. Dallas seems so vibrant and youthful. It was incorporated as a city in 1856, but much of the infrastructure is very contemporary. Like many larger cities in the south, Dallas has a large cross-section of people and many “transplanting Northerners” have made a home there. The diversity of accents are as prevalent as the different occupations. Dallas is home to 21 Fortune 500 companies including Exxon Mobil, AT&T and Texas Instruments.

Old Red Museum, 1892

When in Dallas, a great place to start your visit is the Visit Dallas Visitor’s Center located in the Old Red Museum, 100 S. Houston Street. You can’t miss it…it’s the big beautiful red sandstone building with cool looking gargoyles. It is adjacent to the JFK Memorial and Dealey Plaza.  Originally built as a courthouse in 1892, it houses an interesting museum and also the visitors center.  The center is staffed by folks that can help you plan your trip and know everything from great hotels, shopping and where to find the best BBQ around. The “Dallas City Pass” tickets are also available for purchase here for discounts on many major attractions.  When we were in Dallas, I did purchase them and saved quite a bit. (you can buy them on-line prior to your trip at: http://VisitDallas.com/CityPASS A word of warning, you have to use them up within 9 days, can’t carry over for your “next” trip.


View of some “spaghetti bowl” expressways from the Reunion Tower

Dallas is ranked as the 3rd largest city in Texas. Houston being the largest, than San Antonio. Like many big cities, negotiating traffic is a challenge. Roadways in the city are well-marked, but there seemed to be a preponderance of “access roads” running parallel to the major expressways which frequently begs the question: How do I get over there? I can see where I need to go but how do I get there? Hence the U-turn spot in Dallas in quite common. Granted, helpful….but I think the roads could have been laid out better to begin with. Once you get a feel for it, you’re fine but navigating some of the “spaghetti bowls” can be tricky. We had a rental car so we felt compelled to drive everywhere, but it is my understanding Dallas does have a good public transportation system: DART: Dallas Area Rapid Transit. Then you wouldn’t have to deal with the highways. Yet, it is interesting to note that Dallas is the largest  metropolitan area in the US that does not on a navigable body of water, hence the development of all those roadways. Four major interstates converge in the city. Providing transportation is also enhanced by the railroad system: you gotta move all that cattle somehow.

Pioneer Plaza~Dallas

This leads me to the next feature about the state that is  highlighted in the city of Dallas.  Texas happens to hold the record as the top producer of beef cattle in the U. S., with 2.42 million head of cattle. That’s alot of beef! The proud history and heritage of cattle drives is documented as a public art exhibit in downtown Dallas at the Pioneer Plaza (1428 Young Street). An entire herd of longhorn steers and cowboys on horseback are depicted in beautiful bronze statues. Situated in the heart of downtown in the convention district, it is odd to see an entire herd of life-size cattle making their way through a stream with buildings rising up on all sides. They seem so real, that it seems they should be grazing across fields of grass, instead of surrounded by towering high rises. Yet, that is what makes the exhibit so stunning and a wonderful tribute to the trail riders. Also, adjacent to the plaza is the pioneer Park Cemetery which includes the Confederate War Memorial.

“So….what are you having for dinner?”

Along with being the leading beef cattle producer, comes the wonderful reality that Dallas is one of  the best places for steak! Well, of course. Steak and BBQ, that is. There are so many fantastic places to choose, but choose we did. I found a place that had great food, but when in Texas I have to admit….I looked for the ambiance as well. Nothing says Texas like cowboy boots, whips and a giant steer mounted on the wall staring at you while you dine on steak. Really fun place and it happens to be a chain with a few locations. It was called Salt Grass Steakhouse and I would go back, it was delicious! I know we will probably be making future trips to Dallas.  I missed the Dallas Arboretum this past trip….looks so pretty and of course we need another trip to Salt Grass–Cheers! Put your traveling shoes on. JES



“Dear Bob and Sue” : A Fresh & Fun perspective on the NPS

If you love the beauty and diversity of our beautiful national parks the way I do…then have I got a great read for you! It’s called: Dear Bob and Sue- One couple’s journey through the national parks, By Matt & Karen Smith. I just recently finished reading it and was delighted with how much I enjoyed it.  They provide such fun insights and information about our national parks, but also so many great stories that make the reader literally laugh out loud. In addition to the adventures, they also include interesting and historical information that really enhances a visit to the parks; interesting without presenting like a boring text book. I really enjoyed reading about the parks I have already been to, then it was great also having the opportunity to find out more on the parks my husband and I hope to visit.

I see myself in the pages of this book and laugh when I see some of the authors behaviors mirrored as my own, especially when it comes to my great interest (or as my family would say: obsession) with the national parks. One of these parallels is my collecting from each and every park I have been to in the NPS the Visitor’s Guide, trail maps, newsletters, etc. Some I scrapbook with my photos, some I just save. Well, in the book Matt has the same idea and a meticulous filing system for each national park.  Good for him! I salute those organizational efforts. In the book, read the hilarious conversation on page 114 about the propensity for saving all those great brochures. I hear you Matt. Another regular habit of park goers, that Matt and Karen regularly adhered to, is the importance of having your PASSPORT to Your National Parks stamped. I didn’t purchase my Passport until after I had already visited several parks. In the interest of documenting ALL the parks I had visited, I went back and filled in the dates with a make shift “logo” of the park. Not the official “stamp”, but at least I documented that I was there. I know….kind of obsessive. Yet, a fun remembrance of my travels.

Even though this book provides information on the national parks, it is not meant to be perceived as a guide book, but rather as collection of stories about the discoveries and beauty awaiting travelers to the national parks. I would highly recommend it and it can easily be found on Amazon.   If you have the pleasure of reading this, I would be interested in your feedback here on my blog. Happy travels! JES


San Diego Sunshine

San Diego Harbor

The weathermen in San Diego are pretty much bored. It is the same old song every day: “Sunny and 70, Folks”. Out of the 365 days of the calendar year, San Diego’s average temperature is 63 degrees with 266 sunny days per year. Yet, that is such a lovely kind of boredom…and oh so pleasant. No wonder San Diego is such an intriguing tourist destination and the weathermen have such great job security; they are correct almost every day. The sun and surf are terrific, but you don’t have to be a sun-worshiper to enjoy all the sights and activities that this California city has to offer. An addition to enjoying the beautiful ocean views and beach, there are also many “must-sees” in the city itself.

Old Town Trolley Tours

My oldest son moved there several years ago, so I have been to visit this city many times and have favorites sights that I love to return to time and again. If you are just becoming introduced to the city, a great place to start is the Old Time Trolley Tours. They take you to 10 different stops throughout the city including: Balboa Park, San Diego Zoo, the famous Hotel Del Coronado, the Maritime ship museum on the waterfront and many more. The trolleys have a “Hop on, Hop off” system that allow you to see what you want and visit your preferred sites at your leisure. In addition to getting a great overview of some of the key sights in the city, the trolley drivers share a multitude of interesting historical info and trivia.  Did you know that San Diego is actually the “Birthplace of California”. In June of 1769, the first Spanish presidio and mission was established by the San Diego River making it the oldest European settlement on the west coast of the U.S. In tribute to the rich history of San Diego, it’s very fitting that the Trolley Tours would be based out of Old Town. Established today as Old Town San Diego, the site commemorates life in San Diego from 1821 to 1872. It includes shopping, restaurants,museums and the logical start for the trolley tours. You can purchase tickets at any of the 10 stops, but Old Town is the main facility and the starting and ending point for the tours.

Being so close to the emerald waters of the beautiful Pacific, when in San Diego one must really check out several of the beaches there. Coronado, by the infamous Hotel Coronado, is one of the most scenic, pristine beaches in the area. Mission Beach and Oceanside Beach are loved and frequented by both locals and tourists. Of course shops for beach gear and souvenirs are readily found at both.

Brown Pelican~ San Diego Harbor

If the beach scene isn’t quite your thing, you can still enjoy the Pacific with the many day cruises available. Depending on the time of year, a whale watching tour can be an excellent choice because from December thru the beginning of March, the whale migration patterns skirt the San Diego coastline. I recently took a 4 hour whale watching tour with great success: we saw several whales breech. In addition to the grey whales we spotted an abundance of other sea life including dolphins, sea lions, pelicans and cormorants. My bird watching senses were on full alert. It’s hard to capture in a photograph a grey whale breeching, but it is easy to see and photograph the brown pelicans flying around. At first glance they seem like awkward creatures, but in flight they are rather majestic. It is also truly amazing how big some of them get. For more information on the whale watching tour, you can check out their web site at: http://www.flagshipsd.com

Cabrillo National Monument

Having a passion for our National Parks, I would be remiss if I did not mention San Diego’s National Park site: The Cabrillo National Monument.  It celebrates the natural and cultural history of the area.  Juan Rodriquez Cabrillo  was the first Eurpoean, in 1542,  to set foot on a “very good enclosed port”.  In addition to telling the story about the 16th century exploration, a visitor can take in a terrific  view of the Pacific from Point Loma, and also a lighthouse is on the premises. The Point Loma Lighthouse was originally built in 1855.  It ceased operation in 1891, but is open to the public today as a museum.  It may be a small, seemingly insignificant lighthouse, but it has many interesting stories behind it. During the time of its operation, it was at the highest elevation of any lighthouse in the United States. (Impressive!)


The California Tower and the Museum of Man~ Balboa Park

So I saved my very favorite feature of San Diego for last: Balboa Park.  It holds the title as the nation’s largest urban cultural park. Every single time I go, it never fails to amaze and awe me. Bird of Paradise flowers, exotic trees, jeweled mosaics in the architectures, fountains and of course an array of interesting people to watch. In addition to the natural beauty found in the park, there are 17 museums. The museums have something for everyone from art and photography to anthropology, aerospace and even a model railroad museum for all the train buffs out there! Also, within the park boundaries is the world famous San Diego Zoo. It is hard to spend only one day at Balboa Park to try to take it all in. I have been there several times, and every time I go there are new surprises and delights.


So, San Diego is highly recommended as a travel destination. Remember that travel and tourism is San Diego’s third top industry (behind manufacturing and the military) So they want you to have a great time. Put your traveling shoes on. JES

Cabin Fever Cures

Sub-Zero temps, arctic blasts and record-breaking snowfalls have started out the New Year with a bang, and it’s not just the folks in the part of the country who are used to typical January weather. Many parts of the country, even in typically warmer climates, are experiencing drastically cooler temperatures accompanied by snow and icy conditions. cabin-in-snow My son in Dallas the other day,  said it was 20 degrees with some icy roads. Dallas. Wow. This kind of puts to rest the argument of climate change; something is definitely different. Nevertheless, as the cold marches on I think it is good for the soul to get outside, even for a short time, for some of that crisp fresh air to help ward off cabin fever.

Most of us have to face the elements anyway for work, school or errands. However,  modifying your perception of these tasks really helps lighten the load. If you can add a little something special to your trip, it makes even the most mundane task that much better. For example, treat yourself to a specialty coffee or make a stop at that place you have driven by a million times and have always vowed to stop in and check it out. I did just that yesterday with surprising results.

On a routine trip to Walmart, I went a little further down the road to a shop that I have always been curious about called the “Taylors Falls Bead Store”. I always thought it was basically jewelry making, but come to find out it was that and more! Like many women, I enjoy jewelry but this store has a dazzling array of not only semi-precious stones, bead work and jewelry making supplies but they also have amazing rocks and fossils for you rock hounds out there. Who can’t helped but be amazed when viewing the crystal formations inside a geode or amethyst.  It also adds to the fun that the staff is really enthused and knowledgeable about their products. They also offer of a variety of classes if you are interested in pursuing various arts involved with stones, metal and leatherworking. You know those little charms you put on wine glasses? They can even teach you how to make those! I may have to look into that class. If you are interested in checking this place out, it is located in Taylors Falls, MN. They are about 1 hour northeast of Minneapolis/St. Paul. Yet, they also have a website that is fun to check out:http://www.taylorsfallsbeadstore.com

Another sure fire way to cure cabin fever is start planning your warm weather get-away trips.  It’s always fun to looks at green grass, flowers, mountain trails to hike and perhaps sandy beaches to languish on.  Whatever floats your boat.  It may not help with shoveling the driveway, but it may take some of the sting out of the north wind biting your face.  If all else fails, stay home and watch some videos of dogs playing in the deep snow…like this one.  (Shared by my cousin Kay in Syracuse New York….currently dealing with  quite a bit of snow! Thanks Kay!) This is sure to warm your heart and bring you a chuckle.

Stay Warm, Stay Safe–then…Put your traveling shoes on. JES

Parks & Politics: Trying (so very hard) to keep politics out of the discussion.


I love our National Parks and am a strong supporter of keeping the beauty and sanctity of our most treasured natural spaces. I travel to the Parks, I research the Parks and I blog about the Parks. I have wanted my discussions and observations to be encouraging and support our National Park Service and perhaps encourage others to enjoy and appreciate our Parks.  Up to this point I have done that and will continue to do so, however in light of recent developments with the current federal administration I can no longer keep silent. I really don’t want my blog to be about politics, but if you discuss the National Park Service you can’t avoid talking about the federal government because after all, it is managed as a branch of the federal government. In 2016, the National Park Service celebrated their centennial: celebrating 100 years of the establishment and development of a world renowned system. A system that highlights the beauty of our Parks and assures the appreciation of such for generations to come.  Yet now, so many of these lands are being threatened by persons that want to exploit the land for monetary gain.  Sadly, it would be a gain that would not last and would forever destroy the beauty of the lands that were set aside for preservation.

It started as a shell game by a magician (Donald Trump) who graciously donated $78K of his own salary to the National Park Service.  On the surface this may seem as a good will gesture, but it pales in comparison to the amount of money he proposes cutting from the Department of the Interior, which operates the National Park Service and other agencies.  Money magazine reported that the President’s proposed budget would cut $1.5 billion from the Department of the Interior.  Of course it is not just money we are discussing, it’s also the irreparable harm that could befall our parks if some of the mind set of the current administration is allowed to proceed with “raping and pillaging” of our most breathtaking, sacred lands.

Let me give you just one consideration, just the tip of the iceberg, that I do consider “raping and pillaging” of one of our most beautiful National Parks: The Grand Canyon. The Trump administration is currently considering a review of the ban on uranium mining in the watershed of the Grand Canyon. The ban was originally put into place by President Barack Obama because of concerns of not only destroying the beauty of the canyon, but also the danger of polluting the Colorado River. I absolutely cringe at the idea of this and hope and pray that this will not come to fruition.

Bears Ears National Monument in Utah/ photo from PBS.org

I was prompted to write this by news that surfaced just Monday from the Trump administration.  Two federal national monuments in Utah were drastically reduced in size, making it reportedly the largest rollback of federal land protection in the nation’s history. Bear Ears National Monument was reduced by 85% and the Grand Staircase-Escalante was reduced to about half it’s size.   The current administration presents these changes as a need to put more of the land use to local and state controls, out of operation of federal control.  In theory that may sound like a good plan, but what types of land use could occur on unprotected lands?  More mining, more logging, more gas extraction?  Once land has been stripped of it’s beauty, it does not recuperate overnight. Is the Administration really taking into account what the local residents want?

Teddy Roosevelt and John Muir at Yosemite

President Trump may not even have the legal right to pursue revising the status of certain public lands that were established under the Antiquities Act.   Trump’s legal authority to make these changes is already being challenged with the filing of several law suits against these actions.  The Antiquities Act was signed into law in 1906 by President Theodore Roosevelt. It authorizes the President to protect landmarks, structures and objects of historic or scientific interest by designating them as National Monuments. Herein lies a problem with the verbiage that gets “tricky”. First of all the distinction between a National Park and a National Monument causes problems with the dos and don’t with land usage.  For example, some of the lands that are considered monuments, already have certain mining within the territory, whereas you would not see that happening in a National Park.  Second, Park preservation varies from President to President and what one may deem important, the other may choose to rescind.  IF there is a legal way around it. I don’t know how much of the Antiquities Act has to be adhered to, I just know that the Trump administration is really pushing the envelope on this.  He’s messing with it. I know that legislation can become outdated and frequently needs to be revised…but not this one.  I will bet you that Teddy Roosevelt and John Muir are rolling in their graves thinking of what is even being considered in our most beautiful parts of the country.

I don’t profess to be an expert and I don’t know all the ins and outs of pending legislation, but I want to have a voice. I don’t want to be “afraid” to speak up. I want to voice my thoughts on one of my true passions: the beauty and sanctity of one of America’s greatest treasure: Our National Parks. May we all continue to protect and preserve them. Put your traveling shoes on.  JES

The Glory of “The High One”: Denali National Park

Sunrise on Denali / NPS Photo by Tim Rains

Many travelers venturing to Alaska include on their itineraries Denali National Park, and rightly so. It provides breathtaking vistas in a rugged land to etch in your mind a memorable trip. Within Alaska alone, there are 24 parks and sites managed by the National Park Service, however Denali usually comes to mind when people think of Alaska. Denali is  Alaska’s most well-known national park and is actually more readily accessible than some of the other remote parks.  Denali averages over  400,000 visitors annually. The flag ship feature of the park is the 20,320 feet high mountain peak known for thousands of years by the Athabascans as Denali, or “The High One”.

So What’s in a Name?  The park we know today as Denali National Park was founded in 1917 by Woodrow Wilson as Mount McKinley National Park. The name of the Park has been a controversy since it’s inception.  There are certain ironies that one can’t help but ponder on. First, the name McKinley was taken from our 25th President William McKinley. McKinley himself had never traveled to Alaska.  Perhaps he would have gone to see the majestic mountain and park, but sadly he was assassinated in September of 1901. Charles Sheldon, a naturalist and conservationist, advocated from the start the name of Denali for both the park and the mountain. The locals called it Denali, and the debate continued for decades. Finally in 1980, many continued to favor the name Denali after the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act changed the park’s name to Denali National Park and Preserve. But the official name of the mountain remained Mount McKinley.  Then just prior to the National Park Service centennial year in 2016, the mountain was reverted to the name Denali. While visiting Alaska in September of 2015, President Barack Obama announced the official name change of the mountain.

Bull Moose~NPS photo

Keeping the “wild” in Alaskan wilderness.  The vastness and diverse ecosystems of the park are beautifully preserved and presented to visitors by virtue of how the park is operated and maintained.  Unlike other National Parks, access into the park is restricted and controlled by only one road, 90 miles long into the park.  Personal vehicles are not allowed beyond the 15 mile mark on the park road; only the shuttle buses taking visitors back and forth from several destinations. This may seem odd at first, but when you take a bus trip into the park it helps you to understand  how this system helps to minimize car travel and reduce the carbon footprint on this wilderness. Riders are free to get on and off the bus as they please.  Another distinct advantage is that you are much more likely to view an abundance of wildlife.  The animals have become accustomed to the big tan buses along the road and are more likely to view them as just a part of the landscape. When we went, we observed, from the safety of the bus, a mama Grizzly helping her two cubs to hunt a ground squirrel. That was an experience I will never forget.

Horseshoe Lake~Denali National Park

In addition to the park road, the trails allow foot traffic within the park for both the casual hiker and the seasoned veteran. Some of the more seasoned hikers are encouraged to “make their own trail”, but for the casual hikers there are several trails starting closer to the Visitors Center.  An easy hike, 1.5 miles, to the beautiful plateau above Horseshoe Lake provides ample opportunities for stunning photographs.  You can see why they call it Horseshoe Lake as evidenced by this photo. Wildlife thrives in the vastness of the park and the “big five” have been designated as: grizzly bears, wolves, moose, caribou and Dall sheep.  It may be a personal goal to view all five, but don’t be too disappointed if you don’t view them all. You can always pick up a coffee mug or t-shirt with all of them on it; sounds a bit touristy but a great way to remember your visit.  My family and I saw a grizzly and her cubs from quite a distance and also a mother moose and her cubs, but sometimes it’s very cool to also capture them on a souvenir. Not quite the same as seeing them in real life, but it’s so neat to bring back the memories of your trip and be able to say you’ve been to Denali. Wolves and grizzlies are not as easily seen, but the abundance of Moose in the park makes it almost a sure bet you will see them at some point. Depending on the year, the moose population within the park fluctuates of course, but the National Park Service estimates about 1,800 Moose at Denali.  That’s alot of Moose!  Just FYI, the plural of Moose is Moose…good to know.

Visiting with one of the Sled Dogs of Denali

“Mush, Doggies! Mush!” You can’t get up close and personal with a grizzly, but at Denali you can get close and cuddly with the sled dogs.  In the winter months, the best way to get around from here to there within the park is still by sled dog team.  One of the must see attractions at Denali is the sled dog demos and a visit to the kennels.   Even if you are visiting in the summer, they have to keep the dog’s training going year round, so they add small wheels to the sleds to run them on all terrains.  During the summer tourist season, they have 3 daily dog sled demonstrations.  The Park Service runs several shuttles to the kennels.  When I was there I was amazed to find out the importance of the use of dog sleds withing the park and also within the state of Alaska.  The most famous, well -known sled dog race, the Idiatrod, has a colorful and intriguing history.  Portions of the Iditarod trail were used as early as the 1880’s, However the most famous event in the history of Alaskan mushing is the 1925 serum run to Nome; also known as the “Great Race of Mercy.” A large diptheria epidemic threatened Nome. The only way to get the antitoxin to Nome was by sled dog, due to unusable planes and ships in the worst of winter.  So on January 27, the port at Seward had received the serum where it was passed to the first of twenty mushers and more than 100 dogs who relayed the package 674 miles from Nenana to Nome. The dogs ran in relays, with no dog running over 100 miles. Wow, I hear that story and am amazed of the courage and tenacity of those mushers and their dogs. No wonder it has become an inspiring tale; both for those that participate in the Iditarod and those that watch on the sidelines.  All an amazing part of the Alaska experience. Put your traveling shoes on. JES

For more information on Denali National Park, check out: Discovering Denali, A Complete Reference Guide to Denali National Park by Dow Scoggins  and also the National Park Service has great details about the Park including information on park habitats and wildlife.  Check out their web-site at:http://NPS.gov

The Lighthouse Enigma; a sustaining fascination with those Beacons of Light.

Split Rock Lighthouse~Lake Superior

The Lighthouse: for generations of mariners, it helped to guide their safe journey and was a key element in navigation for over 300 years. Yet, with modern radar, Loran (“Long Range Navigation”) and GPS the lighthouses of the past have become transformed from work horses to historical landmarks. Even though lighthouses have become obsolete as a navigation tool, their history and architectural significance  continues to interest many visitors each year.  So why this interest in Lighthouses? To so many people, myself included, there is a sustained fascination with both the buildings themselves and the stories behind the “keepers of the light.” Lighthouses are not just little buildings by the water, they also have provided avenues of both historical and architectural study.

Additionally, they have become somewhat of a symbol as a “cultural reference” to provide guidance and inspiration to weary souls, referenced to as such in both literary works and popular culture.  In terms of symbolism, there is a dichotomy that exists between the isolation of the lighthouse keeper and their job requiring them to have a connection; a contact with the outside world.  That is why I, and perhaps others, feel such a connection to  lighthouses.  I sometimes feel a sense of isolation, but at the same time believing (hoping) that I am part of the community and part of something bigger. It’s good to think we are all a part of something larger in the scheme of things.

With respect to literary references, the one that jumps to my mind is  To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf. The story takes place in 1927, but many of the struggles that the characters deal with are timeless. In the story, the lighthouse is a symbol of spiritual strength and guidance amidst all the stormy seas of life.  Yet, conversely there is a certain sadness inherent in this representation because life goals of each character, represented by the illumination of the lighthouse, are frequently unattainable.  The light may continue to illuminate, but there is a chance we may never reach safe harbor.

So beyond the cultural references, the physical evidence remains: there are over 1,000 lighthouses in the United States alone.  Many of these are in disrepair and hardly recognizable as a lighthouse.  Nevertheless, there are so many that have been restored and have become added to the list on travel destinations for many US travelers. The greatest concentration of lighthouses are found in the Midwestern states, by virtue of the  Great Lakes. The state of Michigan has more lighthouses than any other state with over 120.  With all these architectural wonders steeped in history, it is not surprising that organizations have been chartered to maintain and preserve them. One of the main organizations, with several “satellite” branches is the United States Lighthouse Society. Yes, there is such an organization with their main goal to: “endeavor to become the primary source for lighthouse and lighthouse heritage information.” Their web-site is an amazing source of both historical information and stunning photographs.  Check out their site at: uslhs.org

I last wrote about Lighthouses in my blog from March of 2016.  My curiosity about lighthouses has not waned and I have had the good fortune to visit a few more and learn even more on the topic. I am a firm believer that whatever your age, you can always learn something new.  It’s interesting that when you dabble in a subject, you just keep uncovering more about it.  Perhaps you are more attune to learning about things that were right there in front of you all along. My interest in lighthouses is a perfect example.  When I first began to dig deeper into the subject of  lighthouses, I discovered more information about the United States Lighthouse Society. 

Point No Point Lighthouse Hansville, Washington

A trip to the west coast to visit my sister-in-law included several beach walks by one of my favorite little lighthouses: Point No Point. Not very tall, but it has served it’s purpose located along the major shipping lanes along the Kitsap Peninsula. It was built in 1879 and was the very first lighthouse built on Puget Sound. Yet, the interesting thing is that the United States Lighthouse Society is housed in The Keeper’s Quarters of this lighthouse.   Small world.  I have walked by this same lighthouse countless times and did not know that it houses the organization that connects people to their love of lighthouses.  Their spectrum is not just the west coast, but from across the country and including information on Alaska and Hawaii lighthouses.

So many trips in this country might possibly include a trip to a lighthouse in the area you are visiting. Pencil one in on your itinerary; you won’t regret the nautical history lesson and the beauty of the beacon itself. Put your traveling shoes on. JES

Marblehead Lighthouse on Lake Erie, Marblehead, Ohio